What are the 3 genuine quantifiers grammar rules?

quantifiers grammar rules

In English, quantifiers grammar rules relate to the words standing before a noun to show its amount. When we are asked about the number or the amount of something, is when quantifiers grammar rules take place to help the learner to understand, and at the same time respond to the assigned question. Quantifiers can be used for both countable and uncountable nouns.

How to use quantifiers?

Quantifiers grammar rules, as the name indicates, show the quantity of a noun on the basis of certain principles that accompany each word. In English, there are specific quantifiers that usually precede countable nouns while others stand before uncountable nouns.

In some occasions there are a number of quantifiers that can be used for both countable and uncountable nouns including: “all”, “enough”, “more/most”, “less/least”, “no/none”, “not any”, “some”, “any”, “a lot of”, “lots of”, and “plenty of”.

With countable nouns we can use: “many”, “a few/few/very few”, “a number (of)”, “several”, “a large number of”, “a great number of”, “a majority of”.

Words like “much”, “a little/little/very little”, “a bit (of)”, “a great deal of”, “a large amount of”, and “a large quantity of” stand before uncountable nouns.

Quantifiers grammar rules: Countable nouns

quantifiers grammar rules

When studying the quantifiers grammar rules, which concern countable nouns, it must be remembered that asking questions about theses nouns requires the speaker to start the question with “how many?”.

Once the question is set, the speaker should know that countable nouns are shown by numeral (both singular and plural) form. For instance, if a person asks a question like “How many books do you have?” the respondent should know, which type of quantifiers grammar rules are being used.

Relating this example, the types of the countable quantifier that can be used are:

“many”, “a few/few/very few”, “a number (of)”, “several”, “a large number of”, “a great number of”, “a majority of”.

In response to the previous question, one example of the speaker’s answer could be: “I have a few books.”

Quantifiers grammar rules: Uncountable nouns 

Uncountable nouns, unlike countable nouns, always come in singular forms due to their undifferentiated quantity. The questions asked about these types of nouns mainly start with the question of: “How much?”

They are usually answered with the help of quantifiers grammar rules that state that uncountable nouns can only be preceded by words like:

 “much”, “a little/little/very little”, “a bit (of)”, “a great deal of”, “a large amount of”, and “a large quantity of”.

If people are asked “How much sugar do they have?” They can already guess that “sugar” is an uncountable noun based on the presence of “How much?” at the beginning of the question. Therefore, the respondents can instantly decide, which quantifier to use with this type of uncountable noun.

Shared quantifiers 

Among the shared quantifiers between countable and uncountable nouns including:

 “all”, “enough”, “more/most”, “less/least”, “no/none”, “not any”, “some”, “any”, “a lot of”, “lots of”, and “plenty of”)

There are a few quantifiers grammar rules that the learners need to know before proceeding them in their use.

For instance, in the use of “some” and “any”, the students of English need to know that the former doesn’t usually come in a negative or an interrogative sentence, but in the use of “any” the opposite rule is applied. Example:

“I have some books on the shelf.”

“I don’t have any books on the shelf”.

conclusion

when dealing with quantifiers grammar rules, the first step in teaching the learners about these concepts should concern the type of nouns. This requires the teachers’ attention toward the introduction of countable and uncountable nouns, the quantifiers standing before them, and those quantifiers that can precede both types of nouns.  

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