Who wrote the old lady song and the best impact of this song in the classroom?

Abstract

“there was an old lady who swallowed a fly” is a cumulative song that tells the story of a woman so funny and absurd that after swallowing a fly and then a spider that has to catch a fly, she finally swallows a bigger one. Larger animals, until they die after swallowing a horse that was supposed to catch a cow.

Old lady song can be a metaphor for situations that seem simple or insignificant and can become complicated if we find the wrong solutions or think we are invincible. The song “There was an old lady who swallowed a fly” was originally written simply as “I Know an Old Lady” in its current form by the author of a book of the same name, Rose Boone, and the artist’s music. Alan Millis, 1952.

Introduction

“There was an old lady who swallowed a fly” (alternately “I know an old lady who swallowed a fly”, “There was an old lady who swallowed a fly” and “I know an old lady who swallowed a fly”) Is a childish nonsense rhythm and song of a kind known as cumulative. Old lady song tells the nonsense story of an old lady who devours large animals to catch each animal that has been swallowed before but dies after swallowing a horse.

The irony of the old lady song stems from the absurdity that an old lady can devour and survive animals of strange sizes inexplicably and impossibly. However, adding a horse is ultimately enough to kill her, and she suddenly applies real-world logic to the old lady song, contrasting its nonsensical nature.

There are several types of sentences in the old lady song, especially to describe the swallowing of any animal. Spiders and flies are described in each verse, but other animals are only described when they begin with a bird. [1] Three copies of the rhyme were collected in Hoosier Folklore magazine in December 1947, [2] beginning with “An old lady – she swallowed a fly,” “Poor little old lady, she swallowed a fly,” and “An old lady,” respectively. ». “She swallowed a fly.” All three lists progress from fly to horse, with variations in the animals being swallowed and the rhymes of each animal.

The final version was written by Rose Boone (song) and Canadian / English folk artist Alan Mills and was published in 1952. At the time, it was simply “I know an old lady.” It was released on Brunswick Records in 1953, where it was sung by Burl Ives. Ayes appeared on his album of folk, dramatic and humorous songs – released in the late summer of 1953. Rose Boone’s 1961 comic book also shows that the poem belongs to her, while the music was composed by Alan Mills.

Strange poems

“It was an old lady who swallowed a fly. I do not know why she swallowed a fly – maybe she will die!”, The book was written by Canadian folk singer and musician Alan Mills. I will be a songwriter. It was first published in a collection of kindergarten rhymes, published in the book “Folklore Hozier” in December 1947.

While swallowing flies is not uncommon, in the second stanza the narrator describes what the old lady did next. The old lady made a rather strange decision to deliberately eat a spider! The narrator declares: “There was an old lady who swallowed a spider, which was moving inside her. The old lady swallowed the spider to catch the fly. I do not know why old lady swallowed a fly – maybe she will die!”

Cumulative song

This style of nonsense rhyme and melody is known as “cumulative” because the mainline is constantly repeated by the narrator, while other lines are added along the way. The lyrics describe the progression from flies to spiders, followed by a bird to eat a spider and a cat to eat a bird. It gets weirder when he swallows a dog to eat a cat and then eats a cow to eat a dog! A cow is not only significantly larger than an older lady, but also a vegetarian, so it is very unlikely that a dog will eat it.

 The horse is the last animal that the old woman swallows with the mistaken belief that she will eat the cow! At this time, it has reached such a ridiculous realm that there is no going back, so the narrator has nowhere to go except to eat something bigger, like a hippo or an elephant. He decides to kill the old lady because she ate the horse. Eating a whole cow had no bad side effects!

Childish musical

Critics have agreed that there is no meaning behind the old lady song – except that it may be a warning story to help the doctor in case of trouble, not to use yourself with strange and dangerous home remedies. The old lady song also found its way into modern culture and was adapted into a children’s musical written by Steven Lee and performed by The People’s Theater Company. Most recently, he took the stage in September 2019 at the Brewery Arts Center in Cumbria.

Old lady song

There was an old lady who swallowed a fly.

I dunno why she swallowed that fly,

Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old lady who swallowed a spider,

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly –

Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old lady who swallowed a bird;

How absurd, to swallow a bird!

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly –

Perhaps she’ll die

There was an old lady who swallowed a cat.

Imagine that, she swallowed a cat.

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die

There was an old lady who swallowed a dog.

What a hog! To swallow a dog!

She swallowed the dog to catch the cat…

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old lady who swallowed a goat.

Just opened her throat and swallowed a goat!

She swallowed the goat to catch the dog …

She swallowed the dog to catch the cat.

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old lady who swallowed a cow.

I don’t know how she swallowed a cow!

She swallowed the cow to catch the goat…

She swallowed the goat to catch the dog…

She swallowed the dog to catch the cat…

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old lady who swallowed a horse –

She’s dead, of course.

There are several literary devices in “The Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly”

Repetition: Occurs when the poet repeats the same images, ideas, structures, words, phrases, etc. in the poem. In this case, the poet depends on repetition throughout.

Refrain: A kind of repetition that occurs when the poet repeats the same stanzas or lines. For example, “There was an old lady who swallowed.”

Hyperbole: Using excessive descriptions, which are usually exaggerated, to make the reader laugh or smile. In this case, the poem is filled with them. For example, “There was an old lady who swallowed a goat. “she just opened his throat and swallowed a goat!”

Alteration: Occurs when the poet uses the same consonant sounds at the beginning of words. For example, “wiggled and wiggled” on line six and “swallowed” and “spider” on line seven.

Detailed Analysis

Lines 1-3

There was an old lady who swallowed a fly.

I dunno why she swallowed that fly,

Perhaps she’ll die.

The first three lines begin with “It was an old lady who swallowed a fly.” They also introduce the first animal that the old lady swallowed and set the cumulative style with which the nursery rhyme is written. The final line of “Maybe He’ll Die” is amazingly sickening for a childish song, especially as it is used as a song. At the end of each paragraph.

Lines 5-9

There was an old lady who swallowed a spider,

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly –

Perhaps she’ll die.

The second stanza follows the same pattern as the first bit. But, it adds another creature. This time the old lady deliberately swallows the spider to catch the fly. This hygienic and nonsensical image should fascinate and entertain young readers. The stanza ends like the rest.

Lines 10-24

There was an old lady who swallowed a bird;

How absurd, to swallow a bird!

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly –

Perhaps she’ll die

There was an old lady who swallowed a cat.

Imagine that, she swallowed a cat.

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die

The next two paragraphs do the same for the second. The old lady swallows a bird and then a cat “to catch the bird”. These animals pile on top of each other and he can feel each one shaking and tickling. It is interesting to note that the narrator repeats “I do not know why he swallowed” in each verse. The old lady gives a reason to take the previous animal, but it still does not make much sense.

Lines 25-43

There was an old lady who swallowed a dog.

What a hog! To swallow a dog!

She swallowed the dog to catch the cat…

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old lady who swallowed a goat.

Just opened her throat and swallowed a goat!

She swallowed the goat to catch the dog …

She swallowed the dog to catch the cat.

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die.

The following two stanzas represent a dog and a goat. Animals get bigger and more absurd. It is harder to believe that anyone can eat one of these animals, much less inflate them completely. The goat’s phrase contains the phrase “he just opened his throat and swollen a goat.” This is a great example of an inner rhyme with “throat” and “goat”. This is a common feature of children’s poetry that usually the more rhymes the better.

Lines 44- 56

There was an old lady who swallowed a cow.

I don’t know how she swallowed a cow!

She swallowed the cow to catch the goat…

She swallowed the goat to catch the dog…

She swallowed the dog to catch the cat…

She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

She swallowed the bird to catch the spider

That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.

She swallowed the spider to catch the fly.

But I dunno why she swallowed that fly

Perhaps she’ll die.

There was an old lady who swallowed a horse –

She’s dead, of course.

The last paragraph brings a cow and a horse. The final line of “Horse” and “Course” is a rhyme, great ending rhymes that create a couplet. The speaker finally concluded that the old lady could never do such a feat. It brings the rhyme to a solid ending that is fun and satisfying. This is certainly true after the seemingly endless repetition of “he swallowed it.”

The effect of the old lady song on learning English by a game

In this game, language learners will be introduced to the traditional song of an old lady who swallowed a fly. They listen to the song, complete comprehension activities, perform the song, and sing the song. Finally, learners can do some developmental work based on the song, write another bit, or create a new version.

Topic:

Animals

Aims:

To develop and practice

Vocabulary: animals (and food)

Structure: Object sources

Integrated skills: listening, speaking, reading, writing

Age:

Younger primary (7 to 9 years)

Time:

Approximately 90 minutes

Focus on vocabulary

• Animals in the song (flies, spiders, birds, cats, dogs, cows, horses) with pictures, memes, or sounds. Try to imitate the animal.

• you are going to listen to a song about an old woman who swallows.

Show these animals by imitating “swallows” (try to exaggerate!) Or explain

Translate if necessary

Think if have ever accidentally swallowed something strange, for example, a tooth,

One button, or if usually swallow gum or toothpaste.

Listening for global comprehension

Play the song. complete Part 2 of the worksheet: Put the sentences in it

Order.

• compare answers in pairs.

Listen again and review the answers as a class.

Listening for detailed comprehension

Now play the first verse and pause. Understand that we do not know why he swallowed one

Fly, and we think he might die!

• Play the second bit and pause. Show the second line through the meme. To arouse

Why did he swallow the spider (to catch flies)?

• Continue verse by verse and explain why he has swallowed each animal (to catch

Previous).

• Complete Part 3 of the worksheet: Write the missing words. Check

answers.

Acting the song out

Play the song now. One learner (or pair) as each animal and

Be an old lady learner. As you sing or play a song, learners play it, for example.

The old woman pretends to swallow every animal in turn and every animal pretends

Take the previous animal after swallowing.

• If you have more learners, or with the same language learners, repeat this with different groups.

Different roles of language learners can be those who express lines

Illustrating the song

Assign each sentence from Part 3 to a group of learners. the

Learners can copy and draw a sentence, for example, a spider is taking it

• Place the pictures on the board to help learners as they sing the song

next level

Singing the song

• Learners sing along to the song. Practice verse by verse – depending on your ability

Students may decide to skip the second line of verses 2-6.

• Sing with the whole song when the learners are comfortable with each beat.

Short written extension

Students wonder what she would swallow if she did not die after

Swallowing Horse. Brainstorm ideas as a class.

Learners draw a picture and write a sentence. Display work around the room.

Give learners time to look at other learners’ work.

Longer written extension

 • If you want to do a more challenging promotional activity, try an old lady

who swallowed some bread. Ask students to imagine that the old lady has made a decision

Instead, she has a sandwich, and they have to think about the ingredients of a very unusual food

Sandwich for her

Learners draw and write sandwiches layer by layer (depending on ability).

For example: “There was an old lady who swallowed some cheese, she swallowed it.”

Cheese to go on the fish, she swallowed the fish to go on the banana, she swallowed

Bananas to go on bread, and so on. You may want to prepare a sheet for it

Learners for this stage, with the support you think they need or less

Conclusion

There is an old lady song id one of those songs which are not only suitable for improvement of the kids’ imagination but it is also suitable for the amelioration of the English language. The old lady gives kids this opportunity to boost language skills like listening, vocabulary, grammar, and also speaking. Songs like the old lady must be included in the language learning programs of the kids.

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